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Phillip 1 year ago
Notice how all these are from the past, even a decade ago or more
       
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Christiana 1 year ago
Phillip,
yep....noticed that too.
       
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Roseann 1 year ago
Phillip, so?
       
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Jud 1 year ago
Phillip,

Um, no I didn't notice that at all. One effort shows data from 2004, mainly due to 2004 being such a major year for the Muir Glacier. The rest are pretty recent. 20% are from 2020. 75% from the last 5 years.

Unless you meant that any remote sensing data is from the past, even if taken seconds ago.

Satellite data usually takes a little while to be made public due to processing requirements (e.g. ICESat-2 was launched in 2018, but some higher level products haven't been produced yet.) Then researchers need time to figure out what the data is actually showing.
       
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Sue 1 year ago
What a shame that even when shown the data and research, some still think this is some hoax. I’m just glad I get to enjoy the planet before it’s completely destroyed. I feel sorry for future generations because it seems humanity won’t do anything until it’s too late. Nobody wants to change their habits, especially big corporations, to prevent a climate change disaster. By the time they realize it’s inevitable, it will be too late.

Also, regarding the images being a few years old, that’s obviously for security reasons. Satellite images made available to the public are never current for obvious reasons.
       
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Elaine 1 year ago
Most of these have nothing to do with global warming.
       
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Franklin 1 year ago
sh#tty post
       
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Karen 1 year ago
#1 Arctic ice cover has increased 50% since 2012. All these photos are examples of weather, not climate.
       
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Iceland’s Ok Glacier Melts Away

"These images show the latter stages of the decline of Okjökull, a melting glacier atop Ok volcano in west-central Iceland. (“Jökull” is Icelandic for “glacier.”) A 1901 geological map estimated that Okjökull spanned about 15 square miles (38 square kilometers). In 1978, aerial photography showed the glacier had shrunk to about 1 square mile (3 square kilometers). Today, less than half a square mile (less than 1 square kilometer) remains."

 

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