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Some “Scientific” Health Facts Were Actually Never True (18 pics)

Posted in Random » Interesting   27 May 2017   / 4583 views

According to “science” the five second rule isn’t true. Bacteria in our environment can contaminate food in milliseconds.

This is another one of those after school specials that lied to you. No, it doesn’t matter which order you consume your liquid diet in. However, adding liquor to a stomach full of beer can create a mixture that metabolizes faster…

Like most things, it’s all about moderation. Sure, if you drink nothing but coffee, the diuretic effects could dehydrate you, but a moderate amount of beer and/or coffee can actually hydrate you just as well as water does.

Remember sitting at that picnic bench, watching everyone else laugh and splash while you waited out that PB&J sandwich? “You’ll get cramps and drowned” Grandma would say. Well, I’m not saying your Grandma is a liar, but she was lying. No evidence has ever been found to prove a full stomach was more prone to cramping.

Is it any wonder that booze is the source of so many myths? I mean, I tell my best stories while drunk too. There is no alcohol that makes anyone more prone to any sort of reactions. If you get horny when you drink tequila, it’s most likely because your body and mind associate it with a pleasurable experience. I guess Gin might actually make YOU a mean drunk…

Though we refer to it as a “cold” it really has nothing to do with exposure to low temps. Obviously, there are certain negative effects of being exposed to extreme elements, but none of them are associated with contracting a cold virus.

After years of research, studies still can’t find any correlation between caffeine consumption and bone growth (or lack thereof) in children.

You know what we really need to cut from our diets? The copious amounts of bullshit that advertisers serve us. You guessed it, this is another myth. Multiple studies have shown that there is no association between drinking the “recommended amount” of milk, and having healthy bones and less fractures.

Chalk another one up to marketing. Damn you sugar demons! Cutting saturated fats from you diet generally leads to you replacing those by consuming sugar and other processed trans-fats, which could actually be even less healthy.

Talk about great marketing. Every athlete on the planet reaches for Gatorade when they’re dehydrated, or so the TV devils have led us to believe. The fact is, most of these drinks are loaded with sugar and could actually have the opposite effect of what you’re looking for. 

While the importance of water is clear, the intake of various amounts of water hasn’t been proven to affect most, if any of the normally associated ailments. We get water from a lot of the foods and other liquids we ingest. As a rule, just have a glass of water when you’re thirsty.

Not to burst your bubble, but this is a complete fabrication. No one is really sure why or where it started, but rest assured, unless you down a dump truck of gum at once, your intestines are safe. Gum is completely ingestible.

Another tall tale that goes back to the elementary school yard. You lose body heat through surfaces of your body that aren’t covered. The reason it seems we lose more through our heads is because they’re more likely to be uncovered.

Nature’s own “fidget spinner” has been ending boredom for me since I can remember. There is not, however, any evidence linking this to arthritis or any other hand ailments. In fact, it is a sign that your joints are well lubricated.

There is actually no scientific evidence to suggest MSG has any negative effect on the majority of people unless consumed in massive quantities. The original “Chinese restaurant syndrome” scare was all because of a letter one whining doctor wrote in 1968.

It’s all that damn tryptophan from turkey that puts you to sleep on Thanksgiving, huh? Wrong. Lots of foods contain that chemical. More accurately, it’s the fact that you eat a small army worth of food and booze.

Not only is there no scientific evidence to link multi-vitamins to good health, they’ve actually been linked to increased risks for some forms of cancer.

Though there is truth to the trillions of bacteria in our body greatly influencing metabolism and obesity, we don’t know nearly enough about it at this time to say what will/won’t help. No matter how many Jamie Lee Curtis commercial they throw at you, it doesn’t make it true.








Tags: scientific, health, facts  




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